A Breach of Trust?

Customer privacy, or closure for victims? The article Apple vs. FBI: A Timeline of the Apple Encryption Case by Jordan Novet is a thorough timeline that follows this recent case. The FBI wants Apple to decrypt the iPhone of Syed Rizwan Farook, one of the San Bernardino Attack terrorists. Apple’s CEO Tim Cook stated, “We do not provide any government agency with direct access to our servers and any government agency requesting customer data must get a court order.” The FBI did not have a warrant for Apple to unlock Farook’s phone, and they are now requesting that Apple create a separate Operating System to have “backdoor” access to Farook’s device. The new iOS would allow the FBI to enter multiple passwords on the phone without it locking or having to decrypt it, but Apple stands by their customers’ privacy. If Apple changes their policy for this particular case, then it will allow government agencies to arbitrarily access other people’s personal data. CEO’s from websites such as Facebook, Google, and Twitter stand with Apple. Presidential Candidates Hilary Clinton and Bernie Sanders are impartial, whereas Donald Trump has boycotted Apple. Victims of the San Bernardino shooting are calling for Apple to give into the FBI’s demands. Given that the article itself is more of a timeline, the author does not seem to have a bias. He closely followed what big names have to say about this instance. I like how this piece was written, as this is a sticky situation in which picking one side might give off the wrong message.

Advertisements

One Comment Add yours

  1. This is a really good example of a complex issue explained with a time table and connecting dots, so the reader can see how the events unfold and how it is significant for all of us, not only for Apple as a company.

    The nut graph is on paragraph:

    “The outcome of the case may have staggering implications. It affects Apple, currently the most valuable company in the world, and it could change the way millions of people view their iPhones: trusted smartphone or potential government surveillance tool?”

    Notice how the editors assume the reader is already knowledgeable about encryption. This publication focuses on technology and business. It will be a totally different language and story if we write on this topic for our student readers.

    Samantha, the link directs us to an another story. This is the actual link:
    http://venturebeat.com/2016/02/19/apple-fbi-timeline/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s